Chat Slang & Tech Terms

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Chat Slang & Tech Terms

Postby moongirl » Mon May 21, 2012 4:53 am

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Re: Chat Slang & Tech Terms

Postby moongirl » Sun Mar 03, 2013 4:06 am

Energy Hog
An app listed under Hog Report means that the app tends to be associated with increased energy use, across all clients. In other words, it isn't specific to your device or your usage or your running instance. The higher the confidence rating, the more likely that closing this app and keeping it closed will result in improved battery life.http://carat.cs.berkeley.edu/



Energy Bug
An app listed under Bug Report means that the app tends to be associated with increased energy use, specifically on your device. In other words, it may be that your instance of the app is caught in a bad state or has a bad configuration. Restarting the app may help if it's a transient problem, but, if not, you may need to close and avoid the app.

Being a hog or bug doesn't mean an app is bad. Some apps, like most games, use a lot of energy by necessity and tend to be classified as hogs. Similarly, some apps use far more energy under certain rare configurations or use patterns; Carat may consider these apps bugs even if the behavior is correct. Regardless, these designations can guide a user toward better battery life.http://carat.cs.berkeley.edu/


Energy Hogs & Bugs - Apps That Sap
viewtopic.php?f=43&t=5220&p=108257#p108257
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Re: Chat Slang & Tech Terms

Postby moongirl » Sat Feb 22, 2014 4:09 am

Glassholes, Explorers & Emily Post



Emily Post would wholeheartedly approve of Google Glass’s attempt at imposed decorum, although whether she could have been persuaded to wear a pair of skinny wraparound glasses with an in-built computer is another matter. Spurred by an array of etiquette infractions by users, Google Glass has issued a list of do’s and dont’s for using the new technology to stop you from becoming a “glasshole.”

The advice is littered with such headache-inducing wordplay. “Respect others, and if they have questions about Glass don’t get snappy,” users, or “Explorers,” are cautioned. But snappiness is surely inevitable if every five paces someone comes up and asks you what you’re wearing on your head. Soon, through gritted teeth, you will seethe: “It’s a pair of glasses with a computer in it, over one eye, so I'm always looking a little bit oddly kind of up and to the side. You must have seen the stuff on the news about it. You turn a little dial thing and scroll through stuff, that’s it, can I go to the dry cleaners now. Thanks!”
http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2 ... guide.html





Emily Post
Emily Post was born in Baltimore, Maryland on October 27, 1872 educated by governesses and at private schools in Baltimore and New York. She spent her summers at Bar Harbor and Tuxedo Park, which her father Bruce Price, a prominent architect, had been commissioned to design and develop.

The season of her debut Emily Price met Edwin Post, her husband-to-be, at a ball in one of Fifth Avenue’s elegant mansions. Following a fashionable wedding and a honeymoon tour of the Continent, Mrs. Post’s first home was in New York’s Washington Square. When her two sons were old enough to attend boarding school, she turned her attention to writing. Her romantic stories of European and American society were serialized in several popular magazines, and many were successfully published in book form. She became a "traveling correspondent" crossing the United States by car and touring Europe on the eve of World War I. Her stories were published in Vanity Fair, Collier’s and McCall’s, to name a few.

After publication in 1922, her book, “Etiquette”, topped the nonfiction bestseller list, and the phrase "according to Emily Post" soon entered our language as the last word on the subject of social conduct.
http://www.emilypost.com/emily-post





Google's Glass Etiquette Guide
viewtopic.php?f=43&t=5349#p109307
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